13 Tips to Help Prevent Kids From Choking

Choke-proof their world: Follow our guidelines to confidently keep teeny toys and “too-big” bites of food from being posing a choking danger to your kids.

By Stephanie Booth from 

On a bright morning last March, Tara Chazen’s 2-year-old son was toddling around his neighborhood park and munching on a graham cracker when a piece of it suddenly got stuck in his throat. Chazen was at work, and by the time his babysitter noticed that something was amiss less than a minute later, the cracker shard had moved from his trachea into his lung. The boy’s face turned purple and he fell to the ground, unconscious.

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Why New Eaters Bite Themselves And How to Help

By Patrick A. Coleman

Kids new to finger foods are fighting reflexes, but parents can help them get a handle on their tongues

Experienced eaters don’t generally bite their tongues and fingers—though, when it happens, it’s a terrible reminder of the ever-present potential for excruciating pain in even the most pleasurable moments. Adults don’t have to think about not biting their own hands or the insides of their mouths when they eat, because chewing and chomping safely is reflexive. Not so for babies. And as toddlers transition from breastfeeding to finger foods, the victims can often be their actual fingers.

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Why You May Want to Skip the Sippy Cup for Your Baby

By Melanie Potock, MA, CCC-SLP

Syda Productions/Shutterstock

Are sippy cups really the best cup to introduce after (or alongside) breast or bottle? Experts suggest a straw or open cup instead, and here’s why.

First comes breast or bottle, then sippy cup, right? Not so fast. Experts report you may want to just skip the sippy cup for your baby. Surprisingly, sippies weren’t designed as a tool for feeding development, but were invented years ago by a dad who just wanted to keep his carpets clean! (Ha ha, we can relate.) Today, parents often think that a sippy cup is what they are supposed to offer to help kids eventually learn to drink from an open cup.

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7 Success Strategies for Safe Baby-Led Weaning

By Jenna Helwig

To raise an adventurous eater, many moms swear by letting a baby feed himself. Whether you want to try this method, called baby-led weaning, a little or a lot, here’s what to keep in mind.

The formula vs. breast-milk debate was so your life six months ago. As your infant approaches his half birthday, the pressing question now is: Will you give him pureed food or bite-size chunks to pick up and eat? In a nutshell, that’s the “baby food” versus “baby-led weaning” debate.

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When Do Babies Hold Their Own Bottle?

By Lambeth Hochwald

Feeding baby her bottle is a wonderful bonding experience. But let’s be honest, it would be nice to have your hands free at some point. While it’s ultimately up to baby to decide when she’s ready to serve herself, there are a few things you can do to help her get ready. After all, baby holding a bottle is an important milestone. It’s a sign her brain and muscle development is right on track—and a tiny reminder for mom that taking care of baby does get easier. So when do babies hold their own bottles, and how can you help them along? Read on for answers.

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Why Is My Baby Pulling At Their Ears? They’re Trying To Tell You Something

By Shannon Evans

When it comes to infants, parents can drive themselves crazy reading into every nonverbal cue they give. You’re constantly on the lookout for common ailments like ear infections, so when you see tiny hands heading towards those ears, your antennae prick up. But are infections always the culprit? When parents ask, “why is my baby pulling at their ears?” they’re likely to come across a large spectrum of explanations.

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Why Does My Baby Hate Their Pacifier? There Are A Few Reasons

By Shannon Evans

I’d read enough Mommy 101 lit to know better than to let pacifiers do my parenting for me, but I wasn’t expecting to have the opposite problem.  It seemed like everyone else’s baby was perfectly content sucking on a pacifier every once in awhile, but not mine. What’s the deal? I would constantly wonder in frustration.Why does my baby hate their pacifier?

It turns out, there’s more to pacifier magic than simply popping it in like a cork and expecting peace. Timing, as they say, is everything.

Read more on ROMPER >>