Why You May Want to Skip the Sippy Cup for Your Baby

By Melanie Potock, MA, CCC-SLP

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Are sippy cups really the best cup to introduce after (or alongside) breast or bottle? Experts suggest a straw or open cup instead, and here’s why.

First comes breast or bottle, then sippy cup, right? Not so fast. Experts report you may want to just skip the sippy cup for your baby. Surprisingly, sippies weren’t designed as a tool for feeding development, but were invented years ago by a dad who just wanted to keep his carpets clean! (Ha ha, we can relate.) Today, parents often think that a sippy cup is what they are supposed to offer to help kids eventually learn to drink from an open cup.

Read more on Parents.com >>

7 Success Strategies for Safe Baby-Led Weaning

By Jenna Helwig

To raise an adventurous eater, many moms swear by letting a baby feed himself. Whether you want to try this method, called baby-led weaning, a little or a lot, here’s what to keep in mind.

The formula vs. breast-milk debate was so your life six months ago. As your infant approaches his half birthday, the pressing question now is: Will you give him pureed food or bite-size chunks to pick up and eat? In a nutshell, that’s the “baby food” versus “baby-led weaning” debate.

Read more on >> FitPREGNANCY

When Do Babies Hold Their Own Bottle?

By Lambeth Hochwald

Feeding baby her bottle is a wonderful bonding experience. But let’s be honest, it would be nice to have your hands free at some point. While it’s ultimately up to baby to decide when she’s ready to serve herself, there are a few things you can do to help her get ready. After all, baby holding a bottle is an important milestone. It’s a sign her brain and muscle development is right on track—and a tiny reminder for mom that taking care of baby does get easier. So when do babies hold their own bottles, and how can you help them along? Read on for answers.

Read more on The BUMP >>

Why Is My Baby Pulling At Their Ears? They’re Trying To Tell You Something

By Shannon Evans

When it comes to infants, parents can drive themselves crazy reading into every nonverbal cue they give. You’re constantly on the lookout for common ailments like ear infections, so when you see tiny hands heading towards those ears, your antennae prick up. But are infections always the culprit? When parents ask, “why is my baby pulling at their ears?” they’re likely to come across a large spectrum of explanations.

Read more on ROMPER >>

Why Does My Baby Hate Their Pacifier? There Are A Few Reasons

By Shannon Evans

I’d read enough Mommy 101 lit to know better than to let pacifiers do my parenting for me, but I wasn’t expecting to have the opposite problem.  It seemed like everyone else’s baby was perfectly content sucking on a pacifier every once in awhile, but not mine. What’s the deal? I would constantly wonder in frustration.Why does my baby hate their pacifier?

It turns out, there’s more to pacifier magic than simply popping it in like a cork and expecting peace. Timing, as they say, is everything.

Read more on ROMPER >>

The Great Pouch Debate: Pros, Cons and Compromising

By Melanie Potock

Brace yourself. We are about to talk about pouches. You know, those little packets of convenience, filled with all sorts of fruits and vegetables, sometimes with a little chia or quinoa mixed in. Parents love them, kids push up the puree and suck it right down in a flash, and speech-language pathologists get all in a fluster about them.

Let’s chat about the pros, the cons and a few compromises in the great pouch debate among parents and those of us who treat clients with feeding challenges. The benefits seem obvious to parents, but as a pediatric feeding specialist, I’m not a big fan of those plastic bags of puree. Why? It’s just too much of a good thing. Let’s examine the pros and cons of feeding kids via pouches on a daily basis.

Read more on the ASHA Leader Blog >>

5 Tips to Create an Adventurous Eater Through Baby Self-Feeding

By Nancy Ripton

While it may seem like babies have been eating purees for centuries, jarred food wasn’t even an option until the 1940s. In fact, the way people feed their babies tends to change every decade or two based on new research and social norms. Baby self-feeding is a research-based approach to first feedings, and delivers a simple way for parents to help their children develop a healthy relationship with food from day one.

Read More on People Babies >>