Why You May Want to Skip the Sippy Cup for Your Baby

By Melanie Potock, MA, CCC-SLP

Syda Productions/Shutterstock

Are sippy cups really the best cup to introduce after (or alongside) breast or bottle? Experts suggest a straw or open cup instead, and here’s why.

First comes breast or bottle, then sippy cup, right? Not so fast. Experts report you may want to just skip the sippy cup for your baby. Surprisingly, sippies weren’t designed as a tool for feeding development, but were invented years ago by a dad who just wanted to keep his carpets clean! (Ha ha, we can relate.) Today, parents often think that a sippy cup is what they are supposed to offer to help kids eventually learn to drink from an open cup.

Read more on Parents.com >>

The Definitive Guide to Help Parents Prepare for Back to School Stress

by Allison Hendricks

As the final month of summer has official begun, it’s time to start thinking of the upcoming school year. With back-to-school shopping, choosing extracurricular activities and attending parent/teacher orientation, it’s time to get organized and ready for the big transition from late summer nights to early school mornings.

Luckily, we have a few tips to help make the new school year less stressful. Check it out!

Read more on Zing by QuickenLoans >>

The Best Feeding Schedule For Toddlers, According To Doctors

By Sarah Bunton

For plenty of parents, convincing their child to eat healthy food — and do it often — can be a never ending conversation. You may have lucked out and have a pint-sized sprout with a particularly sophisticated palate. Or you might have resorted to bargaining, hiding vegetables, and downright begging to get your child to eat. No matter what kind of dietary dynamic you have with your child, it’s still helpful to learn what the best feeding schedule for toddlers is, according to the experts. Of course, every child is different and checking with their pediatrician before making and major nutritional changes is a good idea.

Read more on ROMPER >>

 

Why Is My Baby Pulling At Their Ears? They’re Trying To Tell You Something

By Shannon Evans

When it comes to infants, parents can drive themselves crazy reading into every nonverbal cue they give. You’re constantly on the lookout for common ailments like ear infections, so when you see tiny hands heading towards those ears, your antennae prick up. But are infections always the culprit? When parents ask, “why is my baby pulling at their ears?” they’re likely to come across a large spectrum of explanations.

Read more on ROMPER >>

Does Your Child Need Early Intervention?

By Barbara Smith

If your child is experiencing developmental delays, don’t worry. Here’s what to know and what you can do to help.

Soon after birth, your child will show off her personality and develop skills such as briefly gazing at objects, communicating that she wants to be held, and fussing to be fed. Although children develop at their own pace, most achieve certain milestones — crawling, walking, saying first words — at around the same age. When children are not reaching expected milestones and are showing significantly delayed development, parents may worry. Suspecting a “delay” is scary, but there may not always be a problem.

Read more on Parents.com >>

Seven Surprising Things You Can Do at Home to Help Your Child Eat New Foods

By Melanie Potock

1. Explore Food away from Meals: Use food for other purposes than eating to increase the child’s exposure to the food in fun, interactive ways.  For example, learning to match colors with orange carrots & red bell peppers gets those nutritious foods in your child’s hands and that’s a safe, fun place to start!  Here’s a video demonstrating that process.

Read More on Generation Rescue >>

The Great Pouch Debate: Pros, Cons and Compromising

By Melanie Potock

Brace yourself. We are about to talk about pouches. You know, those little packets of convenience, filled with all sorts of fruits and vegetables, sometimes with a little chia or quinoa mixed in. Parents love them, kids push up the puree and suck it right down in a flash, and speech-language pathologists get all in a fluster about them.

Let’s chat about the pros, the cons and a few compromises in the great pouch debate among parents and those of us who treat clients with feeding challenges. The benefits seem obvious to parents, but as a pediatric feeding specialist, I’m not a big fan of those plastic bags of puree. Why? It’s just too much of a good thing. Let’s examine the pros and cons of feeding kids via pouches on a daily basis.

Read more on the ASHA Leader Blog >>

Three Reasons Why Kids Get Hooked on “Kids’ Meals”… and How to Change That

By Melanie Potock

Let me say this up front: I’m not condemning the American Kids’ Meal that is so common in fast food chains and family restaurants, but clearly I’m not keen on eating that type of food when there are other choices.   My own kids have certainly had their fair share of chicken nuggets, mac n’cheese and French fries, just to name a few of the comfort kid foods that predictably reappear on kids’ menus day after day.   This is not a blog about good vs. healthy nutrition, because most parents (including me) know that the traditional fast food fare is not healthy…and that’s exactly why parents want to change the statistics that 15 percent of preschoolers ask to go to McDonald’s  “at least once a day.”  

Read More on The ASHA Leader Blog >>