7 Surprising Baby Safety Mistakes You Might (Still) Be Making

By Tamekia Reece

September is National Baby Safety Month. Check out these surprising “don’ts” that many parents still do.

When it comes to baby safety, there are quite a few rules you probably know well: Put baby to sleep on his back, no bumpers or loose bedding in the crib, store poisonous items out of reach, never leave baby unattended on an elevated surface. The list goes on and on. Even though you do all of those things (and more), you may still be making mistakes that put your baby at risk. Right these wrongs to keep your baby safe.

Read more on Parents.com >>

What to Do When Baby Refuses a Bottle

By Kara Mayer Robinson

Not all babies take to a bottle right away. Try these tips to turn your feeding problems around.

Try When Your Baby’s a ‘Little’ Hungry

“Ideally, a baby needs to be alert and just hungry enough to be interested, but not so hungry that baby will become frustrated and upset,” says Melanie Potock, MA, a pediatric feeding specialist in Longmont, CO.

Look for hunger cues. Give it a try when your baby is hungry but not starving. A frantic baby and a sense of urgency make it harder.

Read more on WebMD >>

What Is Speech Therapy?

By Barbara Smith

Photo by Aimee Herring

If your child has a speech disability that includes trouble pronouncing words, speech therapy may help improve language development, communication, and pragmatic language skills.

Speech therapy is an intervention service that focuses on improving a child’s speech and abilities to understand and express language, including nonverbal language. Speech therapists, or speech and language pathologists (SLPs), are the professionals who provide these services. Speech therapy includes two components: 1) coordinating the mouth to produce sounds to form words and sentences (to address articulation, fluency, and voice volume regulation); and 2) understanding and expressing language (to address the use of language through written, pictorial, body, and sign forms, and the use of language through alternative communication systems such as social media, computers, and iPads). In addition, the role of SLPs in treating swallowing disorders has broadened to include all aspects of feeding.

Read more on Parents.com >>

Finger Foods for 10-Month-Old Kids

By Rosenya Faith

She’s about to take another leap toward independence, and it’s going to get messy. Finger foods help your little munchkin develop new skills and explore through new tastes and textures. You’ll probably be able to tell when she’s ready for more when you find her reaching for the spoon at feeding time and trying to swipe food off your plate. Until she gets good at feeding herself though, get ready to take plenty of pictures of her adorable food-covered face and be prepared for lots of floor scrub-a-thons.

Read more on Mom.me >>

Ten Tips for Making Progress in Feeding Therapy

By Melanie Potock

The end of a year is a reflective time for many parents, especially those who have children in any type of therapy.  As a pediatric SLP who focuses on feeding, I asked over forty parents for their number one tip that helped their child progress through feeding therapy.  I found it interesting that typically what popped into their minds wasn’t an oral motor tool or a specific therapy modality or other tips like “practice, practice, practice!”  What struck me was that most parents focused on an emotional component.  When we consider the bond between parent and child, that makes perfect sense.  I learn so much from the parents of the children I treat and I’m grateful for their wisdom. Here are the Parents’ Ten Tips for Making Progress in Feeding Therapy.

Read More on The ASHA Leader Blog >>

Sippy Cups: 3 Reasons to Skip Them and What to Offer Instead

By Melanie Potock

In the article Step Away from the Sippy Cup, I discussed how the sippy cup was invented for parents, not for kids. An engineer got fed up with his toddler spilling juice on the carpet and the rest is history. Today, sippy cups are marketed to parents as a vital piece of feeding equipment, causing parents to consider sippy cups an essential part of a baby’s development. As a speech-language pathologist and feeding specialist, I beg to differ on this point. Here’s why:

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Solutions for School-Day Breakfasts

By Natalie Hammer Noblitt

Many consider it the most important meal of the day, but a healthy and filling breakfast can get lost in the shuffle while rushing everyone out the door for school and work. Retailers can help parents and kids find satisfying options that will jumpstart young minds and provide go-to foods they’ll come back for throughout the year.

Read More on The Gourmet Retailer >>

Health experts: Longmont case an extreme example of dietary deprivation

By Amelia Arvesen

A boy consumes the highest amount of calories in his life as a teenager, which Boulder County dietitians consider a crucial time for him to grow into a healthy and strong man. Yet if he were exclusively fed junk food over an extended period of time, they say his body would begin to wither away without the adequate nourishment.

Read More on TimesCall.com >>

Empowering Parents to Raise Happy, Healthy Eaters

By Melanie Braga

This month’s “Mom of the Month” is an inspiring woman who is changing the way we parent in the kitchen. She is providing resources to empower parents to raise happy, healthy eaters. This change maker is Melanie Potock, MA, CCC-SLP and I am thrilled to have her as this month’s Mom of the Month. Melanie is an international speaker, author and certified speech language pathologist who specializes in the assessment and treatment of feeding disorders, including picky eating.

Read More on Momma Braga >>